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Wednesday, 4 May 2022

The future?

Dear reader,

You may have noticed that over the last few months I've been rather active on YouTube. I'd neglected the YouTube channel to be honest. It takes a lot of effort to make a video, it's not just the filming, but the editing, rendering, uploading, dealing with the odd copyright hassle, etc etc.

I find it much easier to take a few photos and write. 

Back just before Christmas time, there was a slight change in my career. It involves me being in front of a camera, presenting technical stuff, as well as my engineering duties. This didn't initially sit well with me, so I thought I'd get some practice in and rejuvenate the existing "Doz' Television Workshop" YouTube channel. 

Well, it's gone all a bit better than expected. Each video I've done on Doz' Television Workshop has gained me subscribers (and lost the odd one or two along the way), and I get way more "views" than I do hits on this website. This has soaked up a lot of my time. 

So, what's the future?

I don't want to neglect the website. It's like an old friend, I thoroughly enjoy writing, and I don't want it to just become a list of my YouTube videos, and indeed, from now on, I won't just post up links to videos. If you want to watch my videos, just hit the subscribe button, if you don't, that's fine.

I think this site has a future with design projects (and, in fact there's a few in drafts), that may have accompanying videos, maybe not so much the repair and restoration projects. 

I have really enjoyed channels like Noel's retro lab, ojnoj. Irish Vintage TV and Radio, Shango066. These videos tend to be longer than many, I find myself absorbed by them. It's a community I want to be a part of. In the day job, our marketing dept. tell me my videos should be "around 10 mins" ... well, I can't see that happening here! There's just no way I can do an in-depth diagnosis & repair in just a few minutes, and I won't try. To be honest, it's something the website doesn't convey. The actual length of time it takes to do these things.  

This isn't about money. This website carries a few adverts, and, in it's entire lifetime hasn't earned me £130 in revenue. My YouTube channel can't be monetised (as yet), I simply don't have enough subscribers. Let's face it, I'm never going to retire on this. 

This isn't about my ego. Yes, I get a kick out of someone watching my video, but it's in the hope they found it educational, or at least entertaining. It's about sharing.

Let me have your comments. 

Yours Aye,
Doz.

5 comments:

  1. For what it's worth, I enjoy reading your blog and prefer it to any Youtube video about fixing gear (not only yours, I mean).

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    1. Thanks for taking the time to comment. I'm coming round to the idea that I may just do both for each job. It would actually help to write the webpage as I go (as I would normally), whilst filming, as that would make the editing process easier. Nothing like doing a job twice! This sits better with me. Keeps the website fresh with plenty of new content, whilst feeding the YouTube monster. World domination next ... ;)

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  2. I also prefer to read a blog at my own speed rather than having information pushed down my throat. Having said that, I am also enjoying your videos (one of the subscribers you gained!) and accept that some subjects, such as your 'scope tube tv are better displayed by moving pictures.

    Please keep going on both streams, using your judgement to select which to use.

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    1. I'm pretty much set on the idea that for repair type posts, there will be a write-up and a video. For projects, there will be a comprehensive write up on the design, and a video showing the operation (a bit like I did with the recent GPS project). This should keep everything happy. Thanks for your input.

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  3. Whatever path you end up taking I am sure it will be interesting. With so much interest in the resurrection and reuse of ancient kit there is a lot of demand. One idea is to have a mini series of videos/posts on the use of test equipment - it’s often just assumed that people know how to get the best out of what they have and I suspect it’s not true.

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